“Would I attend my own conference?” (@SarahM) and other links…

Sarah Milstein: “In a way, this isn’t a big surprise. It’s well-documented that women are underrepresented in the tech sector (if you’re not already up to speed, start with‘‘Out of the Loop in Silicon Valley’ by Claire Cain Miller, and do not miss‘‘The Men and No Women of Web 2.0 Boards’ by Kara Swisher). And it’s also well-documented that across sectors, women are underrepresented in senior roles—i.e., the sorts of positions that are likely to have stories to share at conferences. So, yeah, the population of female speakers we can draw on is smaller than the population of male speakers. But Expo generally has just 150–250 speakers total per show (and most conferences have fewer). Why can’t we find 75–125 women speakers?”

“Educated, Unemployed and Frustrated”

Matthew C. Klein via @Nikyatu: “Millions of college graduates in rich nations could tell similar stories. In Italy, Portugal and Spain, about one-fourth of college graduates under the age of 25 are unemployed. In the United States, the official unemployment rate for this group is 11.2 percent, but for college graduates 25 and over it is only 4.5 percent. ”

“Dropping my MVP”

David Woods: “MS states how they have these ‘experts’ in the community and that are involved in the products. While I have met some really smart MVPs I have also met some that are so out to lunch on things yet MS still considers them experts. To me this completely devalues the MVP program. I am definitely no exception to this. I am a MVP in developer security yet I don’t consider myself to be an expert. Interested yes. Expert no.”

“American students do poorly in science, report says”

Reuters: “The figures in the report cannot be easily compared with the past because students were assessed in a new way that includes advances in science and pedagogy, and to bring it in line with international standards.”

“Customers as Competitors”

Paul Schwartz: “I’m seeing an interesting trend in my client work. The metrics used to measure the health of customer relationships are declining, yet the companies have not really changed anything operationally. So how does one explain this disturbing trend?”

“Google confirms what we already knew about great managers”

Steve Arneson: “For starters, technical expertise ranked dead last on the list of desired management traits.  Which, Google admits, surprised them.”

“Feminism For Real: Deconstructing the Academic Industrial Complex of Feminism”

Latoya Peterson: “Our multi-talented homegirl Jessica Yee just edited and published her first anthology.  Called Feminism for Real: Deconstructing the Academic Industrial Complex of Feminism, Yee and her contributors (including myself and Andrea Plaid) keep it raw by illuminating the some of the issues people of color (particularly Indigenous people) encounter when entering feminist spaces.”